Does the ginger shot trend work?

Ginger shots have been becoming more popular over the last few years, but the question is of course whether or not they’re just a fad. And whilst there definitely is a decent amount of science to back up some of the claims around ginger, whether that’s boosting immunity or reducing inflammation, you do need quite a large amount of specific gingerols (the compounds in ginger) leaving us with the main question of do ginger shots actually have enough gingerols to do anything or is it just the placebo effect.

What are Ginger Shots?

Ginger shots are concentrated drinks in this case shots made from fresh ginger juice. The main bioactive compounds in ginger such as gingerols and shogaols have been shown to deliver quite a few health benefits.

How Much Ginger Should I Put In A Ginger Shot?

Generally you’ll want around 1-2 grams of fresh ginger per day can be beneficial for inflammation. [1] That's roughly a small piece, about the size of your thumb but you’ll need all of it. Supplements can sometimes be stronger than this if they use concentrated extracts like eurovita 77 which was shown in arthritis trials to be as effective as 2 grams. [2]

How To Make A Ginger Shot

  1. Gather Ingredients: You'll need fresh ginger root and lemon. You can also use powdered ginger. 
  2. Prepare Ginger: Peel a small piece of ginger (about 1-2 inches) and chop it finely.
  3. Squeeze Lemon: Extract the juice from half a lemon.
  4. Blend: Combine the chopped ginger and lemon juice in a blender or food processor. Blend until smooth.
  5. Strain: To achieve precision, strain the mixture through a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth to remove any solid ginger particles.
  6. Serve: Pour the clear ginger juice into a shot glass.
  7. Optional Additions: For added punch, you can include a dash of cayenne pepper or a drop of honey.
  8. Enjoy: Down the shot for an invigorating and healthful kick.

The Potential Benefits of Ginger Shots

Boosting the Immune System

While scientific research specifically on ginger shots is limited, studies on ginger in other forms have shown promising results. For example, ginger has been found to reduce inflammation and improve immune function in various studies, meaning that it’s quite likely that ginger shots could have a reasonable chance of doing something. [3]

Digestive Support

Gingerols have been shown to stimulate the digestive system, promoting gastric emptying and reducing bloating and discomfort. Additionally ginger may help alleviate symptoms of nausea and vomiting. [4]

Anti-Inflammatory Effects

Quite a lot of studies have shown that ginger has the ability to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in the body. There have been quite a few studies around arthritis specifically showing that it can help reduce inflammation and improve joint pain. [1]

Potential Weight Loss Aid

There’s been some research has shown that ginger can increase thermogenesis. Which is the process of burning calories.

Additionally, ginger has been found to have a positive effect on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism which could potentially aid in weight management for people that struggle with these issues specifically. [5]

The dosage is about 3 grams, meaning you may need to use a bit more ginger for this sort of use. There have been also been some studies on ginger water for weight loss specifically, although they were in rats, so we can't say for sure that it would translate to humans, but the study in question did show that ginger increased the speed in which fat was broken down and turned into energy. [6] 

Side Effects of Ginger Shots

While ginger shots are generally safe, consuming excessive amounts of ginger can lead to gastrointestinal issues such as heartburn and diarrhea. This can also happen without taking too much as well if you happen to be sensitive to ginger.

To Wrap Up Do Ginger Shots Actually Work?

Whilst there aren't many studies on ginger shots specifically there have been a lot of stuies on ginger itself to suggest there is a reasonable chance that it could have some health benefits. Although if you don't like the taste there isn't really much reason to take a shot over a supplement.

References

1 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9654013/

2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494689/

3 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019938/

4 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341159/

5 - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29393665/

6 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7023345/

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